What is Female Infertility?

What are Female Infertility Causes?

female infertility causesAs you research infertility, you have undoubtedly come across many answers to your questions about female infertility causes and still, you keep searching. Wanting a baby and not getting pregnant or being able to carry a child to full term can be devastating and life-altering, and lead to an unrelenting stressful search to “fix it.” Hopefully, after reading this, you will gain some peace of mind and can make a plan to ease the burden you’re carrying.

If you have been trying to conceive for over a year and you are under age 35, if you are over age 35 and have tried for six months, then you would be classified as having infertility. Furthermore, if you have known medical, menstruation, female organ issues, or male reproductive issues that may be impeding your success, you might also have an infertility diagnosis.

Infertility on the Rise

If you are struggling to conceive, you are not unusual. Millions of couples – at least 1 in 6 – have trouble conceiving. In fact, infertility is on the rise and is not just related to age, though that does play a factor.

There are many misconceptions out there about infertility and treatments; our caring fertility doctors at Vios Fertility Institute are here to help you understand the facts of female infertility and female infertility causes. Then, we are here to assist you with growing your family.

Factors That Affect Fertility

Many couples are waiting until their careers and finances are sound before starting a family, which usually means starting later in life, into their 30s and even early 40s. As we age, egg quality diminishes, as does the strength of our reproductive organs. However, waiting does not signal an end to fertility – it just may take longer to conceive.

Medical factors that play a part in female infertility include ovulatory disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, ovarian failure or primary ovarian insufficiency “POI,” recurrent pregnancy loss, and other medical issues.

Lifestyle factors such as being overweight or obese, smoking, excessive drinking, high levels of stress, diet and nutrition, and not exercising or getting quality sleep also play a large part.

With the help of your doctor or fertility specialist, medical and lifestyle factors can be addressed, managed, and in many cases, overcome for a successful pregnancy.

Fertility Myths

“Infertility” is such a final-sounding word, but dealing with infertility does not mean you cannot have a baby. It means you have issues that need to be addressed in order to conceive. We’ve listed some common myths and misconceptions here, but for more thorough information, download our “Common Misconceptions About Fertility” document to help ease your mind and give you hope moving forward.

I’ve been pregnant before, so I’ll get pregnant again – Just because you and/or your partner have had children previously does not mean your systems are functioning 100% properly in order to conceive again. The CDC estimates that 11% of couples have what’s called “secondary infertility” or difficulty getting pregnant despite having had a child previously. Infertility affects men and women, so we recommend you both get tested.

All the women in my family get pregnant at the drop of a hat – Whether your mother or grandmother had children easily or did not have children easily does not automatically guarantee the same results for you. Genetics are a good guide but not the be-all, end-all of what you will experience.

Smoking doesn’t matter that much – Recent research has found that smoking can be associated with up to a 40% lower fertility rate in both sexes. In fact, it is estimated that 13% of infertility in the United States is caused by smoking! We know that smoking prematurely ages eggs and decreases egg count, even in very young women. If you quit, fertility can improve.

Sex several times a week means we should be pregnant – This is not a guarantee that you will get pregnant. Women ovulate once a month and the egg can only be fertilized for ~12-24 hours after ovulation, so there is a very short window of time when the sperm and the egg can meet. The best time to have sex to maximize pregnancy is on the day of or day before ovulation which occurs about 2 weeks prior to your expected period. Sperm can actually stay in the female reproductive tract for up to 5 days, so it’s always better to err with intercourse before ovulation rather than after ovulation. There are ovulation calendars/apps and predictor kits that can help pinpoint your timing.

Age doesn’t matter anymore – Though it’s true that age is not as big of a factor as before (thanks to fertility treatments), women are born with all the eggs they are ever going to have and once they are gone, they are gone. Because of exposures to such things as radiation, chemicals, smoking, and alcohol, eggs can be damaged as women live their lives which increases the risk of chromosome problems (like Downs Syndrome) as women age. Fertility treatments are MOST effective when they are begun early. Many women who are in their 40s will actually require eggs from a younger woman (in her 20s) for a successful pregnancy

There are other myths out there, like the fact that when you see a fertility doctor, he or she will automatically jump to IVF. This is most certainly not true, and in fact, it’s usually a last step after trying other options.

Infertility is not just a woman’s issue. Many men have fertility issues as well.

There is Hope and Help for Fertility

If you’ve been trying to get pregnant for six months to a year without success or the ability to carry a baby, then it might be time to meet with a fertility specialist. Thankfully, in our wonderful world of science and technology, the majority of couples who see a fertility doctor and work together on solving infertility, succeed.

If you have questions about why you can’t get pregnant, female infertility causes, and would like to learn more about the many options in the fertility process, contact us today to schedule an appointment. Our experienced, caring physicians at Vios are here to help.