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Should You Freeze Your Eggs?

The average age of women having their first child has increased in recent years from 21-26 years old. What is causing the increase? According to Forbes, career goals, pursuing advanced degrees, and wanting financial stability are factors.

Having goals is important but women’s fertility depends greatly on their age. By the time a woman reaches 30 she has about 200,000 eggs remaining in her ovaries, and that number continues to decrease with age.

Egg freezing is a great option for those who want to extend their fertility. Egg freezing, also known as oocyte cryopreservation, is the process where eggs are removed from the ovaries and frozen for future use. The process begins by a woman taking medications before eggs are retrieved and frozen.

Who should consider egg freezing? According to Dr. Erica Louden, anyone! Egg quality and quantity decreases with age so if starting a family isn’t in your near future egg freezing is a great option for you. More specifically, women who will be undergoing cancer treatments, who have premature ovarian failure, and have chronic autoimmune diseases should consider egg freezing.

Assessing the quality of an oocyte before fertilization has, to date, been difficult as there is no standard assessment tool. At Vios Fertility Institute, we are one of the only fertility clinics currently offering Violet™, an AI-enabled software solution for women undergoing elective egg freezing. Learn more about Violet here.

Egg freezing is a great option for those “freezing” their fertility in time for either medical or personal reasons. Speak to a Vios team member about freezing your eggs today!

TO SCHEDULE AN EGG FREEZING CONSULTATION, CONTACT US TODAY!

To learn more about egg freezing and who should consider watch the video and read the below blogs.

ELECTIVE EGG FREEZING: IS IT RIGHT FOR YOU?

EGG FREEZING: FERTILITY PRESERVATION FOR WOMEN

COVID-19 Vaccine and Fertility: What You Need To Know

Graphic of COVID-19 Vaccine and Fertility, What You Need to KnowLately, we hear many questions from patients about the COVID-19 vaccine and fertility and impact on pregnancy.

Vios Fertility Institute follows the guidelines from both the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) in recommending that pregnant women, and women seeking to become pregnant, get the vaccine as it becomes available. These guidelines are constantly adjusted as new data is available and our team will continue to stay on top of the changes.

What else do you need to know about the COVID-19 vaccine and its impact on fertility?

  • Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA)-based and therefore do not contain the live virus. This means that the vaccine elicits an immune response so if the recipient were to get COVID-19 she would have some immunity over it.
  • The vaccine does NOT appear to interfere with fertility in men or women.

Dr. MacKenzie Purdy and Dr. Roohi Jeelani answered many questions on this topic during our Instagram Live this week. Click below to watch!

 

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ASPIRE Study: COVID19 and Pregnancy

Vios Fertility Institute is proud to partner with the University of California-San Francisco to make patients aware of the ASPIRE study regarding COVID19 and pregnancy. ASPIRE stands for Assessing Safety of Pregnancy In the Coronavirus Pandemic.

ASPIRE study on COVID19 and pregnancy

ASPIRE is a nationwide prospective cohort study of pregnant women and their offspring during the COVID-19 pandemic. All Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) member clinics have been invited to share this study information with their pregnant patients, directing patients to register to participate at this website.

From ASPIRE, “The goal of this study is to help understand the spread of COVID-19 infection among pregnant women and how infection might affect the health and wellbeing of pregnant mothers and their babies, particularly when the infection occurs in early pregnancy or without any symptoms. The goal is for this knowledge to inform and empower pregnant women and their healthcare providers to provide the best possible care for their pregnancies and future babies. Also, women and couples planning pregnancies will gain important information to help make decisions for their families.”

ASPIRE is focused on the first trimester, a critical and vulnerable period when all of a baby’s organ systems form and the placenta – the crucial connection between mom and baby – develops.

Currently, there are no data about the effects of COVID19 infections in the first trimester. The ASPIRE study will provide critical information to:

(1) Guide the care of pregnant women
(2) Protect the safety of their babies and families
(3) Help those considering pregnancy in the future understand what it means to be pregnant in this new era

Becoming pregnant at any time is a personal choice and with the added uncertainty of a global pandemic, we realize this decision did not come lightly. We celebrate your pregnancy!

We’re also careful to counsel our patients at every step of their care journey about COVID19 and pregnancy considerations and safety guidelines so that you can feel informed and an active and empowered partner in your care.

Who can join the ASPIRE Study?
Anyone who is over the age of 18 and is between 4 – 10 weeks pregnant. Eligible participants will be compensated financially.

  1. You’ll be asked to:
    1. Submit frequent, quick (<1 minute each) symptom tracking reports using your mobile phone and/or computer.
  2. 2. Collect finger-stick blood samples from home at several points throughout your pregnancy. (A helpful how to video is here.)
  3. 3. Give permission to review medical records related to your pregnancy, delivery and baby’s development.
  4. 4. Complete questionnaires online about your health during your pregnancy and after delivery of your baby.

How to get started:

Visit https://aspire.ucsf.edu/ to learn more and register on their website here.

Do you have additional questions about COVID-19 and fertility treatment at Vios? Click here for our latest update.

Tips for Handling the Holidays While TTC

2020 has been a difficult year so far and we are finally in the home stretch. Despite that, if you are someone struggling with infertility or recurrent pregnancy loss there is one more hurdle left – the holidays.

This time of year can be even more difficult for my patients when the pain and anxiety they feel day to day is exacerbated by the reminder that another year has passed without yet reaching their family goals.

Although celebrating this year will look very different for most of us, there will inevitably still be some small or virtual gatherings with family and friends that could lead to awkward questions from well-intentioned loved ones.

Questions like “Are you pregnant yet?” or “When are you going to start your family?” can seem innocent to the person asking the question but can be very hurtful to those who have been through fertility testing and treatment for months or sometimes years.

Another difficult scenario is the family member who tries to give helpful advice like “just relax and it will happen” or shares stories about how other couples achieved success that have nothing to do with your situation.

Despite this, there are ways to manage the stress of infertility during the holidays and make it easier to enjoy this time of year.

First, feel free to pick and choose who you spend time with. You are certainly not obligated to accept every invitation. Avoiding especially insensitive friends or relatives is okay.

Second, skip opening holiday cards with photos of others’ families and consider limiting your time on social media if those activities trigger negative feelings.

Third, take time to grieve if you need to. You may be grieving a miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, or a failed treatment cycle. The bottom line is, you do not need to pretend to be happy every moment so give yourself space to feel your true feelings and allow your partner to do the same.

Finally, find time to take care of yourself. It might be a small gift for yourself, an experience like spending some time outdoors, or some “me” time like a massage or a virtual yoga class. Don’t forget to take time to do the things that clear your mind and restore your body.

The simple truth is that the holidays can be a struggle for those dealing with the stress and pain of infertility. I hope these tips make your holidays brighter and allow you to find joy as we say farewell to 2020. Hooray for 2021!

Blog post written by Dr. Ellen Hayes.

Verification of Benefits (VOB) Report

Watch the video below to learn more about what a Verification of Benefits (VOB) Report is and how to read it!